How To Find Water In The Wild To Survive

How To Find Water In The Wild To Survive

When you go hiking or camping, you need to stay hydrated. While it is possible to remain without food for days, that’s not the case with water. According to Medical News Today, an average human being can survive without water for about three days.

When you go camping in the wilderness, there are high chances that you may experience difficulties in getting water to drink. The good news is that there are many tactics for how to find water in the wild to quench your thirst.

7 Ways To Find Water In The Wild

1. Look for any signs of water

When you need water in the wilderness, there might be water sources near you. In this case, you should look for signs of water like rivers or streams. You can listen for distanct or nearby sounds like gurgling or rushing sounds. You can go up to high ground to see if you can view any water sources from crevices and other natural formations below.

Can you see any insects and animals nearby? Most of them wouldn’t survive in a dry environment. If you spot them, look anywhere around such places if there is a water source. You could as well try to spot plants such as cattails and lilies which grow well near water. If you see them, be sure to get water around that area.

2. Go to mountainous areas

Is there a mountainous area nearby? Sometimes ice and snow tend to be on mountains. If it’s not sea ice, it is safe to use. However, if you get snow, don’t eat it as it will not help in hydrating your body like water does. Instead, melt the ice to get water by putting it in a container with little water. Avoid putting ice in a hot pot to melt because you won’t like the taste.

3. Drain a piece of cloth

During early mornings, plants tend to have dew. Did you know that you can collect a lot of water from the morning due before the sun appears? You should use a clean piece of cloth to purify the water.

You can also gather water from dew on plants at night. Purify the water by wringing the piece of cloth in your water filter. While the water may not be that much, it will help you in your current survival situation.

4. Dig for water

Digging is not the best idea in a survival situation. However, if you are in a position, digging could be your last option. But before that, you should first confirm that there are signs of ample water before digging.

Forests with thick vegetation indicate that you can dig and get water easily. Are there any recently dried rivers or streams? If yes, you can go on the streambeds and riverbeds and dig a seep. The ground wouldn’t be too hard by then because of that water body that recently dried up.

Dig a hole that measures about ½ a foot deep and 3 feet wide. Make sure the soil turns wet or muddy when you dig. That’s a clear indication that you are about to get water. Keep scooping more mud then line outside that hole with rocks like the way it is done on a well.

Putting rocks will keep dirt away to help you get water and not mud. That’s how you will end up having a seep that will generate water. Water will go to the seep, but you might need to filter it a bit. Always carry digging tools like a survival shovel when you go to the wilderness.

Dig a hole that measures about ½ a foot deep and 3 feet wide. Make sure the soil turns wet or muddy when you dig. That’s a clear indication that you are about to get water. Keep scooping more mud then line outside that hole with rocks like the way it is done on a well.

Putting rocks will keep dirt away to help you get water and not mud. That’s how you will end up having a seep that will generate water. Water will go to the seep, but you might need to filter it a bit. Always carry digging tools like a survival shovel when you go to the wilderness.

5. Use plant condensation bags

In cases where you can’t find any water source nearby, you could make use of available plants. You need plant condensation bags to get water in dry climatic regions. Find a tree branch that has leaves and tie a plastic bag around those leaves for the whole day.

The tree will release its water inside that bag. By evening, you will have gathered some water to help you survive.

6. Harvest rainwater

It is rare to experience rainfall in the wilderness. But if you are lucky, depending on the season, you can experience one. In tropical and temperate climatic areas, there tends to be rainfall at times. In case you go camping in those areas, prepare to carry a small container of water. You don’t have to harvest a lot of water. Just a little is enough to help you survive.

7. Go downhill

If you are near hilly or mountainous areas, you can get water downhill too. You are likely to find streams, lakes, and valleys. It doesn’t matter how small the water source is because small water sources tend to have clean water.

In case you get a place with water coming from the ground, feel free to use it because it is safer compared to that of a river. If you are also near the sea, then you might consider getting water from fish flesh. Seawater isn’t safe to drink because it is salty. Catch fish and extract water from its flesh. Slice it into small pieces and place them on a cloth. Squeeze it, and you will get water.

How To Find Water In The Wild Answered

There is no doubt that the wilderness is a place where water tends to be scarce. If you don’t know how to get it, you might suffer from dehydration. Water is so crucial that it can help you live more days even when you don’t have food. You should, by all means, avoid getting dehydrated. Whether you go camping or hiking, you need to have sufficient water, camping essentials and proper survival tips.

You should strive to identify water sources near you in the wilderness. Aside from that, be creative enough by making use of plants, trees and wet soil available to extract water. You need to travel with essential camping equipment to help you survive in the wilderness. Now you know how to find water in the wild.

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